World Bear Day - March 2323 Mar, 2019 | Posted by: cnhe

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World Bear Day is a celebration dedicated to the rescue and protection of the bears around the world, regardless of the species and natural habitat. On March 23 everyone interested in wildlife care, can participate in celebrating this event.

World Bear Day is a wonderful reason to spend the time with pleasure and joy. Beside that, it also can help to improve the lives of lots of bears. It is a positive way to spread the information about the plight of the bears around the world, as well as to change the sorrowful situations with exploiting of the bears. We wish everyone – bears and humans – live a happy life!

The very first important step which you can do for the bears is to be bear wise. It means that your lifestyle and activities are animal-friendly and don't lead to any harm to the bears.

Your example will as save the lives of animals as encourage other people to support them.

Remember that bears who live in rehabilitation centers are also always need your help. They get correct diet, medical treatment and all the care. Bear centers construct homes for them and do incredible work, which requires a lot of funds.

And there are animals who are still waiting to be rescued. Your generousity by the sponsorships and attention make the dream of such a suffering bear come true!

Please, follow the news of Bear rescue organizations to support their missions in time!

VISIT THE OFFICIAL WORLD BEAR DAY SITE!



World Water Day - March 22 22 Mar, 2019 | Posted by: cnhe

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The theme for World Water Day 2019 is ‘Leaving no one behind’.

This is an adaptation of the central promise of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: as sustainable development progresses, everyone must benefit.

Sustainable Development Goal 6 (SDG 6) aims to ensure availability and sustainable management of water for all by 2030. By definition, this means leaving no one behind.


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Today, billions of people are still living without safe water – their households, schools, workplaces, farms and factories struggling to survive and thrive.
Marginalized groups – women, children, refugees, indigenous peoples, disabled people and many others – are often overlooked, and sometimes face discrimination, as they try to access and manage the safe water they need.

Whoever you are, wherever you are, water is your human right. Access to water underpins public health and is therefore critical to sustainable development and a stable and prosperous world. We cannot move forward as a global society while so many people are living without safe water.

In 2010, the UN recognized “the right to safe and clean drinking water and sanitation as a human right that is essential for the full enjoyment of life and all human rights.”

The human right to water entitles everyone, without discrimination, to sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water for personal and domestic use; which includes water for drinking, personal sanitation, washing of clothes, food preparation, and personal and household hygiene.

To ‘leave no one behind’, we must focus our efforts towards including people who have been marginalized or ignored. Water services must meet the needs of marginalized groups and their voices must be heard in decision-making processes. Regulatory and legal frameworks must recognise the right to water for all people, and sufficient funding must be fairly and effectively targeted at those who need it most.

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VISIT THE OFFICIAL WORLD WATER DAY SITE



International Day of Forests 2019 March 2122 Mar, 2019 | Posted by: cnhe

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CANE supports the International Day of Forests held March 21 every year.

Key Messages

Understanding our forests and keeping them healthy is crucial for our future. Forests will be more important than ever as the world population climbs to 8.5 billion by 2030.

You’re never too young to start learning about trees. Helping children connect with nature creates future generations conscious of the benefits of trees and forests and the need to manage them sustainably.

Both modern and traditional knowledge are key to keeping forests healthy. While foresters should know and understand nature well, they should also learn to use cutting-edge technology to ensure that our forests are monitored and managed sustainably.

Investing in forestry education can change the world for the better. Countries can help ensure there are scientists, policy makers, foresters and local communities working to halt deforestation and restore degraded landscapes.

Women and men should have equal access to forest education. Gender parity in forest education empowers rural women to sustainably manage forests.

VISIT THE INTERNATIONAL SITE





Global Recycling Day - March 1818 Mar, 2019 | Posted by: cnhe

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Global Recycling Day was created in 2018 to help recognize, and celebrate, the importance recycling plays in preserving our precious primary resources and securing the future of our planet. It is a day for the world to come together, and put the planet first.

Our mission is twofold:

To tell world leaders that recycling is simply too important not to be a global issue, and that a common, joined up approach to recycling is urgently needed.
To ask people across the planet to think resource, not waste, when it comes to the goods around us – until this happens we simply won’t award recycled goods the true value and repurpose they deserve.
As a direct result of the success of Global Recycling Day 2018, the Global Recycling Foundation was born in October 2018. The Foundation, formed by the Bureau of International Recycling but run as an independent organisation, will promote and support the global recycling industry in its mission to showcase the crucial role of recycling in preserving our planet’s future.

The creation of the Global Recycling Foundation is a crucial step in securing the long term future of Global Recycling Day and other initiatives aiming at the promotion of a global and united approach to recycling.

It is widely understood, indeed it is at the heart of the UN’s Millennium Development Goals, that climate change is the major, overriding, environmental issue of our time. Collectively, we have to take urgent action.

Recycling (whether industrial or at home) saves more CO2 emissions each year than those generated by the entire aviation industry, while simultaneously protecting the earth’s valuable natural resources.

By combining as many voices and efforts as possible on a single day, the aim has been simple: to drive awareness and to push the urgent need to recycle more effectively around the world, to assure the future of our planet.

Introducing the Seventh Resource

Global Recycling Day will be held on March 18 every year, a day to change the mind-set of governments, businesses, communities and individuals around the world, to see recyclables as resource – not waste.

There are six major natural resources on the planet: water, air, coal, oil, natural gas and minerals. Recyclables have joined them, as the world’s Seventh Resource.

Without recycling, all our used and discarded fridges, plastic bottles, packing boxes, cars, cell phones and paper cups will contribute to the growing waste mountains, which are either incinerated or sent to landfill – never to be used again. Without recycling, we have no option but to continue stripping the earth of her finite virgin resources.

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We have set out the vision for the Seventh Resource in our Recycling: The Seventh Resource Manifesto which was sent to world leaders, UN organisations and environmental activists in 2018. It can be downloaded HERE.

Global Recycling Day 2019: Recycling Into the Future

After the successful launch of Global Recycling Day in 2018, the Global Recycling Foundation has announced the theme of 2019 as ‘Recycling into the Future’.

Global Recycling Day will focus on the power of youth, education and innovation in ensuring a brighter future for the planet. It will take place on 18th March 2019, when people around the world will be invited to show their support for recycling.

Global Recycling Day 2019 will work to get more young people engaged with the power of the Seventh Resource through a variety of key partnerships (to be announced). The initiative will also work with businesses and entrepreneurs globally to share their innovation, concepts and ideas for better recycling practices in the future.

DOWNLOAD THE SOCIAL MEDIA KIT!

For more information visit the dedicated pages on this website.

https://www.globalrecyclingday.com

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International Polar Bear Day - Feb 2718 Feb, 2019 | Posted by: cnhe

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Every year, this global event draws attention to the challenges polar bears face in a warming Arctic—and how we each can help.

You’re invited to celebrate with us!

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Sea ice loss from climate change is the single biggest threat to polar bears. No matter where you live or what you do, you can play a role in turning this around.

While action on climate change is the ultimate answer for polar bears, Polar Bears International also works to ensure we keep healthy populations in the short term.



Our conflict-reduction efforts help prevent injuries to people or polar bears while also keeping communities secure.
Our polar bear maternal den studies add to our understanding of the behavior of families at den sties, including their sensitivity to disturbances.
Our support of long-term population monitoring and other research provides valuable data for management decisions.



VISIT POLAR BEAR INTERNATIONAL FOR LOTS OF RESOURCES, TEACHING MATERIALS, AND MORE INFORMATION!

https://polarbearsinternational.org/get-involved/international-polar-bear-day

November is Radon Awareness Month07 Nov, 2018 | Posted by: cnhe

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Radon is a radioactive gas that is formed naturally by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water. Radon is colourless, odourless and tasteless. When Radon is released from the ground outside it mixes with fresh air and gets diluted resulting in concentrations too low to be of concern. However, when Radon enters an enclosed space, such as a house or basement, it can accumulate to high concentrations and become a health risk.

Radon gas can enter a house any place it finds an opening where the house contacts the soil: cracks in foundation walls and in floor slabs, construction joints, gaps around service pipes and support posts, floor drains and sumps, cavities inside walls, and the water supply.

Radon can also be found in groundwater from private or small community wells. Radon produced in the ground can dissolve and accumulate in water from underground sources such as wells. When water containing Radon is agitated during daily household use – showering, clothes washing or cooking, for example, the Radon gas can be released into the air. However, research has shown that drinking water that contains Radon is far less harmful than breathing the gas. The health risk does not come from consuming the Radon, but from inhaling the gas. And in most cases, the risk of Radon entering the home through water is much lower than if it enters through the ground.

Almost all homes have some Radon. The levels can vary dramatically even between similar homes located next to each other. The amount of Radon in a home will depend on many factors. Because there are so many factors, it is not possible to predict the Radon level in a home; the only way to know for sure is to test.

Find Out more about Radon Testing at: http://www.takeactiononradon.ca/radon-testing

Access resources to share with your friends, family, and patients at https://takeactiononradon.ca/join/health-professionals/